Beam Ceiling

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The Beam Ceiling

Have your space beaming with this classically shaped ceiling fixture in painted aluminum and metal with matte acrylic diffuser. Designed by Johan Carpner, the Beam ceiling fixture lights any room in a home, a hotel room or the interiors of a restaurant with uber-panache. The Beam is included in our ECCO Collection of Performance-Driven Office + Retail Lighting. ECCO, an acronym for [E]nergy-efficient, [C]ompliant for [C]ommercial [O]rnamentation, is a collection of light fixtures built to enhance the architectural attributes of commercial, office or retail settings.

Specifications

Beam Ceiling
Beam Ceiling Tech Drawing
Product Name
Beam Ceiling
Manufacturer
Zero Interior 
Environment
Indoor
Shade
Aluminum
Light Source

GU24 Spiral
CFL

1 x 26 Watt
cUL Certified
Yes

Download product specification sheet for a full list of available size and lamping options


  • Zero Beam Ceiling Black Zero Interior Beam Ceiling Black
  • Zero Beam Ceiling Red Zero Interior Beam Ceiling Red
  • Zero Beam Ceiling White Zero Interior Beam Ceiling White
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Designer

Stockholm-based designer Johan Carpner was educated at University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, or Konstfack, in Stockholm, and has won a number of awards, including Residence magazine’s Designaward and a nod from the Stiftlesen Marianne & Sigvard Bernadottes Arts Foundation. Dwell magazine says of Carpner’s work, “He pulls inspiration from nature, and from grids he finds within the repetitive nature of trees and foliage.” And Bradley Quinn, writing for Nordic Reach, says, “The beauty of Johan Carpner’s work lies in the way it moves. Not movement as in coaxing three-dimensional depth out of a flat surface, but movement in terms of how easily his style flows between the intense lucidity of his graphic designs and the haunting expressiveness of his textiles.”

Quinn credits Carpner’s decade of working as a graphic designer for his dexterity with patterns and motifs. The designer puts his attraction to elemental symbolism this way: "I’ve always been fascinated by how people try to tame nature despite knowing they’ll never actually succeed. It’s the wildness in nature that gives it its beauty. I like capturing the inexpressible and the untamable, because to me, that’s realism, and that’s what tests the boundaries of pattern-drawing.” Quinn’s post, “To capture the untamable,” is beautifully written and definitely worthy of a click through. The Beam by Carpner is, too.

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